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  current news   Press   selected story    
     
  23rd February 2011  
 

Cell behaviors regulated by guidance cues in collective migration of border cells.

 
 




Authors
Minna Poukkula1, Adam Cliffe1, Rishita Changede1,2, and Pernille Rørth1,2.

1 - Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Proteos, Singapore 138673
2 - Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117604

Published in in Journal of Cell Biology, Feb 7, 2011, Vol. 192(3) 513–524.

Abstract
Border cells perform a collective, invasive, and directed migration during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis. Two receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), the platelet-derived growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor–related receptor (PVR) and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), are important for reading guidance cues, but how these cues steer migration is not well understood. During collective migration, front, back, and side extensions dynamically project from individual cells within the group. We find that guidance input from both RTKs affects the presence and size of these extensions, primarily by favoring the persistence of front extensions. Guidance cues also control the productivity of extensions, specifically rendering back extensions nonproductive. Early and late phases of border cell migration differ in efficiency of forward cluster movement, although motility of individual cells appears constant. This is caused by differences in behavioral effects of the RTKs: PVR dominantly induces large persistent front extensions and efficient streamlined group movement, whereas EGFR does not. Thus, guidance receptors steer movement of this cell group by differentially affecting multiple migration-related features.

 
 

 
 


Figure Legend: (A-A’) Analysis of directional bias, persistence, and size of cellular extensions from normal border cell clusters. (A) Projected GFP image of a wild-type border cell cluster (slboGal4, UAS-10xGFP/+); arrows indicate direction to the oocyte. Bar, 10 µm. (A’) Same as A, but after segmentation and automatic definition of the cluster body (blue) and extensions (red). (B) Speed and directionality of border cell clusters during early and late phases of migration. Image from a wild-type video (UAS-CD8-GFP/+;slboGal4/+) showing the border cell cluster between early and late migration and the track of one nucleus (cell) over 2 h (white in overlay; blue below). All cells are outlined by FM 4–64 (red). Bar, 20 µm. (A and B) Asterisks indicate the midpoint of the posterior migration.

For more information on Pernille RØRTH’s laboratory, please click here.