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  current news   Press   selected story    
     
  21 March 2014  
  Human Finger-prick iPSCs Facilitate the Development of Stem Cell Banking
 
 



Authors
Hong-Kee Tan1, Cheng-Xu Delon Toh1,16, Dongrui Ma2,16, Binxia Yang1, Tong Ming Liu3, Jun Lu2, Chee-Wai Wong1, Tze-Kai Tan1, Hu Li4, Christopher Syn5,15, Eng-Lee Tan6,7, Bing Lim3,8, Yoon-Pin Lim9,10,11, Stuart A. Cook2,12,13,14, Yuin-Han Loh1,15,*

1   Epigenetics and Cell Fates Laboratory, A*STAR Institute of Molecular and Cell
     Biology, 61 Biopolis Drive Proteos, Singapore 138673, Singapore
2   Research and Development Unit (RDU), National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore
3   Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, Genome Institute of Singapore, A*STAR, Singapore
4   Center for Individualized Medicine, Department of Molecular Pharmacology & Experimental      Therapeutics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA
5   Health Sciences Authority, Singapore
6   Centre for Biomedical and Life Sciences, Singapore Polytechnic, Singapore
7   Department of Paediatrics, University Children’s Medical Institute, National University Hospital,      Singapore
8   Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
9   Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of
     Singapore, Singapore
10  NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of
     Singapore, Singapore
11  Bioinformatics Institute, A*STAR, Singapore
12  Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore
13  Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK
14  National Heart & Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK
15  Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, Singapore
16  These authors contributed equally to this work

*Correspondence: Yuin-Han Loh, Epigenetics and Cell Fates Laboratory, A*STAR

Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, 61 Biopolis Drive Proteos, Singapore 138673, Singapore; e-mail: yhloh@imcb.a-star.edu.sg

Published in Stem Cell Translation Medicine on 19 March 2014.

Please click here to read article

Please click here to read press release from A*STAR

Abstract

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from somatic cells of patients can be a good model for studying human diseases and for future therapeutic regenerative medicine. Current initiatives to establish hiPSC banking face challenges in recruiting large numbers of donors with diverse diseased, genetic and phenotypic representations. Here, we describe the efficient derivation of transgene-free hiPSCs from human finger-prick blood. Finger-prick sample collection can be performed and "DIY (Do-it-yourself)" by donors and sent to the hiPSC facility for reprogramming. We show that single drop volumes of finger-prick samples are sufficient for performing cellular reprogramming, DNA sequencing and blood serotyping in parallel. Our novel strategy has the potential of facilitating the development of large scale hiPSC banking world-wide.

Figure legend: Illustration of the integrative strategy for human iPSCs banking using finger-prick blood.
Using Finger prick (FP) blood reprogramming, hiPSC facilities can recruit a diverse cohort of donors world-wide. hiPSC facility provides a kit containing sterile finger-prick and blood container to the donor. The donors will complete the informed consent form and the health questionnaire and return them back to the facility together with their FP blood. The facility is able to do a series of DNA sequencing, serological assays as well as hiPSC derivation from a single drop of FP blood sample.

For more information on Jonathan Yuin-Han LOH’s laboratory, please click here.