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  current news   Press   selected story    
     
  17th January 2011  
 

Cilia-driven fluid flow as an epigenetic cue for otolith biomineralization on sensory hair cells of the inner ear

 
 




Authors
Xianwen Yu1,2, Doreen Lau1, Chee Peng Ng1 and Sudipto Roy1,3,*.

1 - Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, 61 Biopolis Drive, Singapore 138673.
2 - Department of Biological Sciences, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Cell Biology and Tumor Cell Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005, China.
3 - Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, 117543 Singapore.

* Author for correspondence (sudipto@imcb.a-star.edu.sg)

Published in Development 138: 487-494 (2011).

Abstract
Ciliary motility is necessary for many developmental and physiological processes in animals. In zebrafish, motile cilia are thought to be required for the deposition of otoliths, which comprise crystals of protein and calcium carbonate, on hair cells of the inner ear. The identity of the motile cilia and their role in otolith biogenesis, however, remain controversial. Here, we show that the ear vesicle differentiates numerous motile cilia, the spatial distribution of which changes as a function of the expression pattern of the ciliogenic gene foxj1b. By contrast, the hair cells develop immotile kinocilia that serve as static tethers for otolith crystallization. In ears devoid of all cilia, otoliths can form but they are of irregular shapes and sizes and appear to attach instead to the hair cell apical membranes. Moreover, overproduction of motile cilia also disrupts otolith deposition through sustained agitation of the precursor particles. Therefore, the correct spatial and temporal distribution of the motile cilia is crucial for proper otolith formation. Our findings support the view that the hair cells express a binding factor for the otolith precursors, while the motile cilia ensure that the precursors do not sediment prematurely and are efficiently directed towards the hair cells. We also provide evidence that the kinocilia are modified motile cilia that depend on Foxj1b for their differentiation. We propose that in hair cells, a Foxj1b-dependent motile ciliogenic program is altered by the proneural Atoh proteins to promote the differentiation of immotile kinocilia.

 
 

 
 


Legend for cover image figure: Developing hair cells (acetylated tubulin, red) in the inner ear of a zebrafish embryo at 30 hours post-fertilisation, with their long kinocilia attached to the otolith (Starmaker, green). Nuclei are labelled with DAPI (blue). The immotile kinocilia serve as static tethers for otolith crystallisation.

For more information on Sudipto ROY’s laboratory, please click here.