News archives


OCTOBER - DECEMBER 17

JULY - SEPTEMBER 17

APRIL - JUNE 17

JANUARY - MARCH 17

OCTOBER - DECEMBER 16

JULY - SEPTEMBER 16

APRIL - JUNE 16

JANUARY - MARCH 16

OCTOBER - DECEMBER 15

JULY - SEPTEMBER 15

APRIL - JUNE 15

JANUARY - MARCH 15

OCTOBER - DECEMBER 14

JULY - SEPTEMBER 14

APRIL - JUNE 14

JANUARY - MARCH 14

OCTOBER - DECEMBER 13

JULY - SEPTEMBER 13

APRIL - JUNE 13

JANUARY - MARCH 13

OCTOBER - DECEMBER 12

JULY - SEPTEMBER 12

APRIL - JUNE 12

JANUARY - MARCH 12

OCTOBER - DECEMBER 11

JULY - SEPTEMBER 11

APRIL - JUNE 11

JANUARY - MARCH 11

OCTOBER - DECEMBER 10

JULY - SEPTEMBER 10

APRIL - JUNE 10

JANUARY - MARCH 10

OCTOBER - DECEMBER 09

JULY - SEPTEMBER 09

APRIL - JUNE 09

JANUARY - MARCH 09

OCTOBER - DECEMBER 08

JULY - SEPTEMBER 08

APRIL - JUNE 08

JANUARY - MARCH 08

OCTOBER - DECEMBER 07

JULY - SEPTEMBER 07

APRIL - JUNE 07

JANUARY - MARCH 07

 
  current news   Press   selected story    
     
  14th November 2012  
  Evolutionarily Ancient Association of the FoxJ1 Transcription Factor with the Motile Ciliogenic Program
 
 




Authors
Shubha Vij1,a, Jochen C. Rink2,a, Hao Kee Ho1, Deepak Babu1,3,4, Michael Eitel5,8, Vijayashankaranarayanan Narasimhan1, Varnesh Tiku2, Jody Westbrook6, Bernd Schierwater5, and Sudipto Roy1,3,4,7,*

1 -
Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Proteos, 61 Biopolis Drive, Singapore, 138673.
2 -
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstr. 108, 01307 Dresden Germany.
3 -

Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543.

4 -

NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, Singapore 117456.

5 -

ITZ Division of Ecology and Evolution, Stiftung Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover, 30559, Germany.

6 -

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and Center for Integrative Genomics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

7 -

School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551.

8 -

Present address: The Swire Institute of Marine Science, Faculty of Science, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

a -

These authors contributed equally to this work.

*Corresponding author

Published in PLoS Genetics on 8th November 2012.
To read paper, please click here.

Abstract

It is generally believed that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) was a unicellular organism with motile cilia. In the vertebrates, the winged-helix transcription factor FoxJ1, functions as the master regulator of motile cilia biogenesis. Despite the antiquity of cilia, their highly conserved structure and mechanism of motility, the evolution of the transcriptional program controlling ciliogenesis has remained incompletely understood. In particular, it is presently not known how the generation of motile cilia is programmed outside of the vertebrates, and whether and to what extent the FoxJ1-dependent regulation is conserved. We have performed a survey of numerous eukaryotic genomes, and discovered that genes homologous to foxJ1 are restricted only to organisms belonging to the unikont lineage. Using a mis-expression assay, we then obtained evidence of a conserved ability of FoxJ1 proteins from a number of diverse phyletic groups to activate the expression of a host of motile ciliary genes in zebrafish embryos. Conversely, we found that inactivation of a foxJ1 gene in Schmidtea mediterranea, a platyhelminth (flatworm) that utilizes motile cilia for locomotion, led to a profound disruption in the differentiation of motile cilia. Together, all of these findings provide the first evolutionary perspective into the transcriptional control of motile ciliogenesis, and allow us to propose a conserved FoxJ1-regulated mechanism for motile cilia biogenesis back to the origin of the metazoans.


Figure Legend:
(A) Scanning electron micrograph of motile cilia on the ventral surface of Trichoplax adhaerens (Phylum Placozoa). Ciliary axonemes (arrow) and ciliary pits (arrowheads) are indicated. Scale bar = 1 μm. (B) Confocal micrograph of motile cilia on the ventral surface of Schmidtea mediterranea (Phylum Platyhelminthes). Ciliary axonemes were stained with antibodies to acetylated tubulin (green, arrow) and nuclei with DAPI (magenta). (C) Confocal micrograph of Schmidtea fed with bacteria containing RNAi for foxJ1. Ciliary differentiation is strongly impaired. Scale bar for B and C = 20 μm.


Video link to wildtype and foxJ1 RNAi worms.

For more information on Sudipto ROY's laboratory, please click here.