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  current news   Press   selected story    
     
  3rd September 2009  
 

Elephant shark ( Callorhinchus milii ) provides insights into the evolution of Hox gene clusters in gnathostomes.

 
 




Authors
Vydianathan Ravi, Kevin Lam, Boon-Hui Tay, Alice Tay, Sydney Brenner and B. Venkatesh

Published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA on 3 September 2009.

Abstract
Hox genes encode homeodomain-containing transcription factors that specify the identities of body segments along the anterior-posterior axis of metazoans. In vertebrates, Hox genes occur in clusters and the number of clusters varies among vertebrates. Whereas tetrapods contain 4 Hox clusters, teleost fishes contain 7 Hox clusters due to a whole-genome duplication in the fish lineage. We have sequenced and analyzed Hox gene clusters from elephant shark, a holocephalian cartilaginous fish. Elephant shark possesses 4 Hox clusters with 45 Hox genes that include orthologs for a higher number of ancient gnathostome Hox genes than the 4 clusters in tetrapods and the supernumerary clusters in teleost fishes. Phylogenetic analysis of elephant shark Hox genes from 7 paralogous groups that contain all the 4 members indicated an ((AB)(CD)) topology for the order of Hox cluster duplication, providing support for the 2R hypothesis (i.e., two rounds of whole-genome duplication during the early evolution of vertebrates). Comparisons of noncoding sequences of the elephant shark and human Hox clusters have identified a large number of conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) which represent putative cis-regulatory elements that may be involved in the regulation of Hox genes. Interestingly, in fugu more than 50% of these ancient CNEs have diverged beyond recognition in the duplicated (HoxA, HoxB and HoxD) as well as the singleton (HoxC) Hox clusters. Furthermore, the b-paralogs of the duplicated fugu Hox clusters are virtually devoid of unique ancient CNEs. In contrast to fugu Hox clusters, elephant shark and human Hox clusters have lost fewer ancient CNEs. If these ancient CNEs are indeed enhancers directing tissue-specific expression of Hox genes, divergence of their sequences in vertebrate lineages might have led to altered expression patterns and presumably the functions of their associated Hox genes.

 
 



 
 

Figure legend: Hox cluster loci in elephant shark. Genes are represented as colored boxes and arrows denote the direction of transcription. Pseudogenes are denoted by the symbol Ψ. The bars below represent repetitive sequences predicted using CENSOR. Each of the four elephant shark Hox clusters is more compact than the single Hox cluster in amphioxus, a basal chordate.



Figure Legend: Evolution of Hox gene clusters in gnathostomes (jawed-vertebrates)


For more information on the Venkatesh/Brenner Lab, Please click here.